7 simple (yet powerful) ways to stand out in the crowd and get more clients!

9 10 2017

 

 

 

Guest author: Deb Legge, PhD, CRC, LMHC

 success-opportunity sign

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are holding off on your marketing efforts because you feel you haven’t found that “MAGICAL” thing that will get you noticed, here’s a secret you should know…

“Magic” comes in many forms!

As a mental health clinician in private practice, it is imperative to continually find ways to get your name and face in the minds of those with access to and influence over your ideal clients. It’s also necessary to find ways to prove your value to your referrers.  These activities occur over time.

There are, however, day-to-day things you can do that can make a huge impact on the reputation you develop in the community. You’d be surprised by the (simple) things that really make a difference to your referrers (including those clients who are a great source of word-of-mouth referrals).  I try to really listen to what my clients and referral sources say to me, especially when it comes to feedback about why they send me referrals over and over again.  I hope that you do, too.

Here’s what I’ve learned by listening to my “tribe”.  Do these things and you’ll be ‘head and shoulders’ above others in your market (because many people simply aren’t doing them).

  1. If you can’t take the referral for any reason (insurance issues, expertise issues, etc.), provide alternatives to your referrer (or to the client they sent to you). Your resourcefulness will be noted, and your efforts will be appreciated.
  2. Thank your referral sources. When you get a referral from a medical professional, have the client sign a release and then send a thank you note and a copy of your initial assessment to the collaborating physician for their chart.
  3. Maintain communication with the involved physician(s). Find out when your shared client will next be seeing the psychiatrist/medical doc, and send over a copy of your last couple of notes to assist in collaboration of care.
  4. Return phone calls in a timely manner. I can no longer keep track of how many new clients tell me that they called several clinicians when they first called me, and I was the only one to return their call. I don’t care how busy you are — check your voice mail every day, and have the courtesy to let people know whether or not you can see them.
  5. Keep up with your paperwork. When you get a request for clinical information (from social security disability, an attorney, etc.), take the time to honor the request as soon as possible. Don’t put your client in the uncomfortable position of hearing from someone else that you dropped the ball on them.
  6. Forget about the “competition”. Quit worrying about how many new clients your colleagues are getting. Be happy for them; develop and express an honest appreciation for others’ success and let go any jealousy you may have.  Successful therapists are always looking for good referrals for their overflow.
  7. Use your downtime (empty slots in your schedule) to check in with your referrers. Find out what you can do to help out your local psychiatric hospital’s discharge planner; ask your school district’s guidance department what services or groups they are in need of in the community; offer to do depression screenings at a local health fair. These things will keep you from grumbling about the holes in your schedule, and push you forward in your efforts to serve more clients.

Bottom line, a little bit of effort goes a long way to increase  your credibility in the community.  People will only do business with you to the extent they trust you —

GIVE THEM REASONS TO TRUST THAT YOU ARE THEIR BEST CHOICE!

Author Bio:

Deb Legge, PhD, CRC, LMHCDeb Legge, PhD, CRC, LMHC, works in private practice in Buffalo, NY. She also specializes in helping entrepreneurial therapists get ‘unstuck’ and grow their practices, including a focus on how to create growth with private pay clients. She recently provided a training on this topic at our 2017 Buffalo Niagara Summer Institute. Her coaching practice has helped thousands of clinicians fill their appointment books using her proven success strategies. Dr. Legge is a Board Certified Expert in Traumatic Stress from AAETS.  Her private practice, located at The Counselor’s Corner, focuses on individuals with chronic anxiety and mood disorders, PTSD and other trauma-related issues, borderline personality disorder, life transition, and grief and loss. In addition to her private clinical practice, she is the founder of Influential Insider’s Circle — the world’s first social learning platform for mental health professionals in private practice.

You can gain access to Dr. Legge’s soon-to-be-released, FREE training:

How to Fill Your Book with Private Pay Clients… And End Your Insurance Struggles for Good, at www.PrivatePayPractice.com

Dr. Legge’s websites:

http://influentialtherapist.com

www.PrivatePayPractice.com 

www.counselorscorner.net

 

 





Men & Trauma: 5 Dynamic, Solution-Focused Questions to Use in Therapy

7 09 2017

Guest Author:

Daniel Lawson, LMHC, CASAC

man in therapy

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I am not what happened to me, I am what I choose to become.” –  Karl Jung

Jung penned these words in 1965, and I find myself returning to them often in my work. The intention of this blog post is to provide clinicians with tangible and pragmatic tools to enhance treatment effectiveness with men who have with trauma histories.  As a solution-orientated therapist, the tools I use are questions.

My hope is that in using these questions effectively with the men you serve, they become more of who they are, and less of who they aren’t.

QUESTION 1: “What has been the greatest accomplishment of your life?”

Whenever I do an initial intake, I spend at least five to ten minutes at the beginning of the appointment with this question.  Asking your client about what they have achieved, builds awareness of their patterns of success.  This also helps the client feel at ease and competent.

Naturally, this question also helps men build confidence.  Confidence in many ways is a requirement for successful goal formulation.  Confidence also decreases men’s fears about treatment and making change.

Sometimes, the client may respond saying that they have not achieved anything great in their life.  As the therapist, it’s important to add, “not yet.”  If a client gives that response, it becomes a very appropriate time to talk about goals and ask, “Well, what would you like to say someday is one of your great achievements?”

QUESTION 2:  “What helped you survive?”

Often times our work as a therapist is to reframe the experience of our client.  This question alters the client’s perception from a place of being a “victim” to being a “survivor.”  This creates different expectations and also allows the client to see that in fact they have done something valuable.  It may also allow them to see other strengths that they possess as well as ways to build upon them.

It is important to note that male trauma survivors may habitually destroy their own self-worth, abusing themselves and ruminating on past failures. This question subtly harnesses the power of positive blame, demanding the client to take responsibility for their success and good decisions.

QUESTION 3: “How do you think other people have gotten through something similar to you?”

One crucial element in maintaining the therapeutic relationship and achieving positive treatment outcomes is respecting the client’s theory of change.  This question begins a conversation about what the client believes about their diagnosis/prognosis and their preferred method for recovery.  This also empowers male clients, offering them a way to collaborate and contribute to their own treatment process.

Sometimes the answers clients give reveal the client has very little hope in therapy in general.  In those cases, it becomes more important to explore ways to increase hope before more recommendations are made.

Clinicians can also use this as an opportunity to task clients to do some “research” and identify people who have recovered from similar situations.  Stories of others’ success increase hope and motivation for change.

 QUESTION 4: “Since this all happened, when have you felt at your best?”

Traumatic experiences can alter our observational skills.  Often times, periods when symptoms are less intense (or absent) remain outside of our client’s awareness.  If a client has no clearly defined goal, or they seem to “complain” habitually in session, it is very useful to provide the client with observational tasks.

This question increases the client’s awareness of what is working in their life and has a meditative quality, allowing them to be more present for greater periods of time.  It also enhances confidence and hope that may set the groundwork for the client to begin communicating about future goals for therapy.  Remember that attention is a limited resource, so whatever your client focuses on gets bigger.

 QUESTION 5:  “Who do you feel closest to in your life?”

David W. Smith coined the term “Friendless American Male” during the 1980’s recognizing the consequences associated with disconnected men.  Many healthy men prefer to connect and socialize with each other through experience rather than dialogue.  In building a positive post-traumatic identity, men can benefit from the company and friendship with other men.

This question helps to identity places of support and connection already in place in the client’s life.  Each client is different and therefore patterns and preferences for connection may be vastly different.  However, this is a respectful way to enhance the client’s support network and enhance their awareness of their process of connection. Once recognized, it may be replicated.

Sometimes, clients may respond saying that they are close to no one in their life.  In those cases, it may be useful to ask them if there was anyone they were close to in their past. If so, how did they go about that process?

CONCLUSION

Remember that all people are patterns that persist.  Change the pattern you focus on, change the life you lead.  Have the courage to ask better questions with your clients.  Our lives are the answers the questions we ask.  Better questions can mean a better life for your clients.

SELECT RESOURCES

Post Traumatic Success: Positive Psychology and Solution-Focused Strategies to Help Clients Survive and Thrive by Fredrike Bannink 2014 (book)

101 Solution-Focused Questions for Help with Trauma by Fredrike Bannink  2015 (book)

American Psychological Association “10 Factors of Resilience”

Based on TIP 56: Addressing the Specific Behavioral Health Needs of Men KAP Keys for Clinicians (SAMHSA)   

 TIP 56: A Treatment  Improvement Protocol Addressing the Specific Behavioral Health Needs of Men 

 Grit: The Power of Passion and Purpose by Angela Duckworth (book)

Essential Research Findings in Counseling and Psychotherapy, the Facts are Friendly by Mick Cooper (book)

Video-“Facts are Friendly Pt 1” – Mick Cooper

Video-“Facts are Friendly Pt 2” – Mick Cooper

Video-“Facts are Friendly Pt 3”  – Mick Cooper

1001 Solution-Focused Questions by Fredrike Bannink (book)

Quick Steps to Resolving Trauma by Bill O’Hanlon (book)

BRIEF, an SF training institute in London

ICCE, a worldwide community dedicated to promoting excellence in behavioral healthcare services

Pennsylvania University  Positive Psychology Center (Seligman)

Penn University with positive psychology questionnaires (VIA Character Strengths Survey)

 Author Bio: Daniel Lawson, LMHC, CASAC, works in private practice in Buffalo, NY. He specializes in working with men to overcome issues with relationships, depression, anxiety, substance abuse, death of a child, childhood trauma, or feelings of anger. Dan is a passionate, eclectic practitioner and bases his practice heavily on a solution-focused approach to therapy.  As a result, many of his clients see the results they are looking for in less than six sessions. Dan also uses DBT, positive psychology, mindfulness, CBT, existential, motivational interviewing, and narrative therapy. When working with men, he focuses on restoring hope and connecting them to their ability to do what it takes to heal. In every session, clients leave with a plan to begin improving their life. In addition, Dan also specializes in supporting Catholic men and woman. He effectively combines his faith with his psychological training to provide therapy deeply rooted in Catholic Theology and Philosophy. Dan is a balanced professional and works effectively with his clients regardless of their spiritual/religious beliefs.  Prior to starting a private practice, Dan worked at Horizon Health Services for ten years. In addition to his clinical experience, Dan has experience in training provision and clinical supervision services.  Visit his websites for information at:

http://catholictherapysolutions.com

www.counselorscorner.net/clinicians.html

 

 

 





When Veterans and Their Families Come for Help: What Service Providers Need to Know

10 04 2015

Guest author: Erica Zulawski, MS, MSW candidate

Military welcome home Jack

Through my personal and professional experience with veterans, I have come to understand the unique needs and challenges some male and female veterans experience when readjusting to civilian life. Many veterans say that the military has forever changed them, especially if deployed to areas of combat or conflict.

Soldier with flag FREE morguefile0001980652808

When PTSD is not diagnosed and treated…

My father was a Vietnam veteran. I would like to share some parts of our family’s story.

  • My father would wake up in the middle of the night screaming from awful nightmares and night terrors. I had never heard a man or anyone scream like that before. I was afraid. My siblings and I did not know what was happening to him, and there was no one to explain anything.
  • My dad drank a lot while I was growing up, and he would isolate himself from friends and family. He was there physically, but rarely emotionally available.
  • I resented him for missing a great part of my childhood because of his alcoholism. I also resented the military in many ways because it had taken away my father’s ability to be a good dad and live a meaningful and satisfying life.
  • He was always angry and irritable with overwhelming emotion, always on edge. Family members were also always on edge hoping not to upset him. My father’s illness controlled and dictated the temperament of each of us.

Vet Blog Post Man a with drink photo from FreeDigitalPhotos.net

  • Though severely “rocked” by his traumatic Vietnam experiences, my father would still proudly hang the American flag each morning. I would say that he struggled with a “love/hate relationship”, a love for his country and the military, but hatred for what he lost of himself in the war.
  • He was a very broken person, consumed with emotional and physical pain, suffering every day and drank heavily to self-treat his symptoms. He desperately needed help, but had no idea that he needed it and was deteriorating with each passing day. My mother had no idea how to get him help, so he suffered in silence until he wasn’t able to do it anymore. There was the lack of support and services available for my father and for us as a family to cope with his PTSD, depression and alcoholism. We felt helpless, scared and overwhelmed.

The only time I ever heard him talk about Vietnam was when his “war buddies” would come over to our house to talk and drink. I still don’t know what he endured in the military. When I began working with veterans, I gradually started to understand that what my father was struggling with wasn’t uncommon among that era of veterans: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and depression from his military service.

Why is it important to understand and identify the unique challenges and needs of veterans and their families?

Soldier hands behind back FREE morguefile0001566431353

I believe there is a great need for social workers  and other human service professionals within the community (both veteran and non-veteran affiliated agencies and organizations) to become educated on serving veterans and their families so that they can best meet their needs. Policies and program are needed to help veterans and families develop coping skills and find supports. Some of the reasons are listed below.

  • Many veterans fail to get the help they need because of social stigma and barriers to health care and other services. Some non-veteran affiliated organizations and agencies may provide services and treatment to veterans because they may not qualify for some or any VA benefits or health care because of their type of discharge; were never activated from a Reserve or National Guard unit; and/or have some apprehension about using the VA system. There are others who are unaware of the benefits and services available to them. Please refer to the link in the Resource section to learn more about the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: Health benefits and eligibility.
  • Being culturally competent and sensitive may decrease the challenges in providing effective services to veterans and their family members. Some veterans will present with chronic and acute mental, social, and physical conditions, as well as being at risk for: unemployment, poverty, homelessness, substance abuse, depression, and PTSD that may be attributed to military related trauma and experiences.
  • To alleviate the backlog of specialty appointments, particularly mental and behavioral health appointments, the VA and Congress implemented the Veterans Choice Card program in August 2014. Veterans who meet the criteria for the program will be allowed to seek health care services outside of the VA system. Please refer to the link in the Resource section to learn more about Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014.
  • Veterans who live in rural areas may not have easy access to VA health care and services and are more likely be treated in non-VA affiliated agencies and organizations. Providers in these demographic areas need to be familiar with their unique needs and challenges. Please refer to the link in the Resource section for more information about Rural Assistance Center: Veterans and Returning Soldiers.
  • Both VA and non-VA affiliated providers need to understand the complexity of deployment and how multiple deployments can impact the mental, emotional and psychological well-being of a person and their ability to reintegrate and adapt back into civilian life, their community and their family. Please refer to the link in the Resource section to learn more about How Deployment Stress Affects Families.
  • Providers need to be aware of signs and symptoms to recognize if the person they are working with has been in the military. In addition, providers need to be aware of referring agencies and organizations and the services available to veterans and their families if the provider is unable to offer needed services. It’s important that the provider not be afraid to ask appropriate and sensitive questions about the person’s military experiences to gain a better understanding in an effort to treat the “whole” person.
  • VA and non-VA agencies and organizations can network to use the best assessment tools, interventions and treatments for veterans and their families.  Please refer to the link in the Resource section to learn more about the Joining Forces initiative.
  • Agencies and organizations can create an environment where veterans and their families feel safe to reach out and find the support and guidance they need. Make it as simple and convenient as possible, and remove barriers to rigid, structured and complex systems that may feel overwhelming and burdensome. Many who try to access services and treatment will either give up or not bother if it’s too confusing and/or has the potential to trigger or retraumatize.
  • Consider the veteran’s life before the military. Think about adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) that may contribute to the issues and problems that the veteran is struggling with- consider pre-military trauma. Think about how the veteran’s complex trauma, pre-military, peri-military and post-military experiences have impacted and affected their overall life within their roles and responsibilities to the family structure, the community, their jobs and school. Please refer to the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study link in the Resource section.
  • It is beneficial to ensure that services and treatment for veterans and their families are implemented in a way that provides the five principles of trauma-informed care: safety, empowerment, trustworthiness, collaboration and choice. Please refer to the link in the Resource section for more information about Trauma-Informed Care (TIC).
  • Children of service members and veterans also have unique needs and challenges, and can be at risk for emotional and mental health issues like secondary PTSD from being affected by their parents’ military related trauma. Please refer to the link in the Resource section for more information about Overall Effects on Children.

Resources

Online self-study course: Trauma-Informed Care: Working with Veterans, Service Providers and the Military Culture with Patrick Welch, PhD, Sgt. USMC (Ret)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: Health benefits and eligibility

Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014

Rural Assistance Center: Veterans and Returning Soldiers

How Deployment Stress Affects Families

Joining Forces initiative

The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study

Overall Effects on Children

Treatment Approaches

NASW Standards for Social Work Practice with Service Members, Veterans, & Their Families

Free online course: The National Child Traumatic Stress Network: Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) Fact Sheet for Clinicians

Free online course: Cognitive Processing Therapy

Trauma-Informed Care (TIC)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: PTSD: National Center for PTSD

Other Helpful Resources

‘Why Is Dad So Mad?’ Veteran writes book to explain his PTSD to his daughter.  Also available at www.amazon.com

Military Times: Rand: Civilian mental health providers don’t ‘get’ the military

The Impact of Deployment on U.S. Military Families

Understanding the Impact of Deployment on Children and Families

Using Trauma-Informed Care with Veterans – Dr. Patrick Welch

Use Veteran recovery stories to build connections

Photo Credits

Welcome Home Jack- Our Hero

Hands behind his back

Soldier with flag

Man with a drink





Behind the Human Curtain: The Courage to Look

2 11 2014

Wow…I was blown away when I read In the Ogre’s Lair: Seeing Light in Shadow by J. Scott Janssen, LCSW, in The New Social Worker Magazine. Scott tells a powerful story of helping a challenging client who was hiding behind his ‘curtain’, behind a very big and intimidating wall. What a blessing it was for this man’s life and for his transition into death that Scott persisted in providing support, even though it was a very stressful relationship. So much of what happens to our clients remains hidden. Sometimes when we consistently present ourselves as compassionate, sensitive and trustworthy people, the curtain will slowly move away-  just enough to allow room for hope and help to slip in.

Through his skillful storytelling In the Ogre’s Lair: Seeing Light in Shadow, Scott shares his experience with us and I included an excerpt below.

Read the full online article here.

I should have seen it coming when I slipped on the bullet casings strewn across the front steps. Or when I rang the doorbell and heard an angry-sounding voice bellow, “Who are you and what do you want?” I identified myself as the hospice social worker and waited…

“I don’t need a social worker,” he growled.

I’d read his medical history—respiratory disease, diabetes, hypertension, skin ulcerations that just wouldn’t heal, a long history of uncontrolled pain. And a single line entered under “Social History”—patient can be hostile and combative.

Our visit that day consisted mainly of him telling me what a bunch of incompetents his medical team had been and why it was their fault he was in such bad shape. He alluded to talks he was having with his lawyer and how he would “settle with those cranks” before he died. He came across as angry, self-righteous, and abrasive. And, yes, hostile and combative…

The visit tension hit its high note when I asked if he was having any suicidal ideation. It was a reasonable question—an ex-cop with guns, over sixty-five, male, socially isolated, terminal illness, secretive, hyper-vigilant, apparent anger issues, wanting to be in control but facing increasing physical decline, protective of his privacy but needing help, possible impulsivity, possible depression, possible aggression, possible PTSD—but Jack didn’t see it that way. He hit the roof.

Over the next many months, I called him regularly and offered visits, bracing each time for rebuff and/or complaint…No conversation, however, remained civil for long. He always found his way back to things about which he was angry, always went back on the attack…

Funny thing was, despite his sarcasm, complaining, and opposition to almost everything our nurses suggested, Jack’s medical condition was stabilizing. Steady care from our staff and Jack’s reluctant willingness to listen to a few recommendations here and there allowed his wounds to begin healing. His blood sugar was controlled, and so was his blood pressure. He even began taking more pain medication and getting more sleep at night. Taken together, his underlying respiratory disease began appearing more chronic, less terminal…

When Jack was finally discharged from hospice service because of this stabilization, I was relieved. I walked away thinking I knew him, thinking I’d seen him, and glad to be done with him. As far as I was concerned, he was an egotistical bully. He was insensitive, foul-tempered, devoid of empathy as well as the most remedial signs of social or emotional intelligence. Although I admired the determination and discipline it took to live alone with all the challenges he faced, these were no excuses for being a mean-spirited, anger-addicted pain-in-the-neck…

Sometimes I felt relief that I’d never see him again. At other times, I had a sense of dread that sooner or later, he’d be back…

On the morning I saw his name once again listed under the previous day’s new admissions, I swallowed hard…

The visit was to be our last. I walked in, and Jack was awake. He smiled wide and held out both arms as if to hug me. My first thought was that he was confused. “Hi, Jack. Remember me?”

His smile broadened (something I’d never seen before), and he said, “My social worker.”

He clasped my hand and continued holding it throughout the visit as I sat beside the bed. “I feel so much better now that you’re here,” he said.

Masking my surprise, and wondering if he was being sarcastic or setting me up, I asked him about what had been going on recently.

“It’s been a hard time.” His eyes appeared to water slightly, “I think I might be dying.”

No secretiveness, no defensiveness, no complaints, no blame or attacks… His memory and concentration were taxed, and he had a hard time finding words, but slowly, methodically, Jack searched for language to describe and process what he was experiencing…

Read the full online article here.

Other Resources

Janssen, J. S., (2004) Dawn is Never Far Away: Stories of Loss, Resilience, and the Human Journey

Janssen, J. S., (2013) Locked in the Vault — Survivor Guilt in Combat Veterans, The New Social Worker Magazine

Janssen, J. S., (2012) Just Plain Stephie: Conversations at the End of Life, The New Social Worker Magazine

The New Social Worker- free e-magazine www.socialworker.com

Lacay, S. (2013) Breaking Boundaries With Empathy: How the Therapeutic Alliance Can Defy Client/Worker Difference, The New Social Worker Magazine

The Therapeutic Alliance: An Evidence-Based Guide to Practice (2010)

Author: Lesa Fichte, LMSW, Director of Continuing Education
Photo Credit: Creative Commons Attribution: privatenobby flickr.com




Therapeutic Relationships: What more do you need?

17 09 2013

Help puzzle freeditigalphotos.netID-100124223

I spent a day with Scott D. Miller, PhD, watching him training people on the power of the therapeutic relationship and how to assess client satisfaction and outcomes with performance metrics for session and outcome rating tools. Since then,  I have been fascinated by the healing power of the therapeutic relationship and its relationship to treatment. There are  evidence-based practices related to establishing therapeutic relationships at the SAMHSA Evidence-Based Therapeutic Relationships page. Yet at the same time, there needs to be a solid treatment approach. I have seen people not heal even though they had a good relationship with their therapist. And I have heard therapists say that they don’t like evidence-based practice because it takes away from the relationship and choice of the client. Perhaps fear of the unknown talking.

Good therapeutic relationships + effective treatment approaches + assessment of sessions and outcomes by the client=  the road to success and healing. And these are all essential in a trauma-informed service environment so that clients receive services within the the five-guiding principles of Trauma-Informed Care (Fallot, 2006): safety, trustworthiness, choice, collaboration, and empowerment.

Recently, trauma therapist  and founder of the Trauma Institute and Child Trauma Institute, Ricky Greenwald, PsyD, wrote a great blogpost about the  Therapeutic Relationship vs. Treatment Model. Here is an excerpt from the post that has already received 147 shares to date from his blog site.

“When I call therapists in other locations to check them out for a referral, I briefly describe the case and ask what their approach would be. Quite a number of these therapists have said something like, “I mainly focus on the relationship, since that’s where the healing comes from.” In a recent survey I saw a number of similar comments. One question focused on choice of technique in a particular context, and a number of respondents wrote some version of, “The technique is irrelevant – it’s the relationship that heals.” Based on my nonscientific sample, I suspect that this position is not uncommon among therapists.

The way it is expressed indicates that this view of the relationship’s primacy is not about psychodynamic theory – in which the therapy relationship is systematically utilized for healing. Psychodynamic people tell you that they’re psychodynamic; they’re clear about what they’re doing, and about the role of technique. No, these therapists are saying that they’ve extracted the essence of the so-called “common factors” research, and concluded that as long as they develop a good relationship with their client, everything else falls into place.

The common factors research – focusing on factors such as empathy, warmth, and positive regard, that may be common across treatment approaches – is quite important, and the centrality of common factors to therapy’s effectiveness has become ever more widely recognized and embraced (e.g., Duncan, Miller, Wampold, & Hubble, 2010). However, this valuing of the relationship over treatment approach reflects a profound misunderstanding of the common factors research.

Duncan & colleagues’ (2010) recent synthesis of the common factors research emphasized the integration and inextricability of the various factors. That is, you can’t just add more empathy or therapeutic alliance to an otherwise non-viable treatment approach and suddenly have a viable treatment. Rather, the common factors are necessarily grounded in a coherent and credible treatment model – itself a common factor – that is embraced by therapist and client. Such a treatment model serves as the foundation for the explanation of the problem, the plans for rectifying the problem, and the hope for successful change. These constitute much of the basis for the therapeutic alliance, the most important predictor of treatment success (Norcross, 2010).

Although it is heartening to see that the common factors literature has reached the practice community, it is concerning to see that it has been commonly misinterpreted in such a way that many therapists may be disregarding the importance of using a coherent treatment approach.”

via Ricky Greenwald, PsyD, Once Upon A Time… TI/CTI Blog–  Therapeutic Relationship vs. Treatment Model, August 6, 2013.

Like this post? check out our other posts on Behind the Human Curtain.

Author for the introductory paragraphs: Lesa Fichte,  LMSW, Director of Continuing Education

Photo Credit: Help Puzzle by Stuart Miles, www.freedigitalphotos.net








%d bloggers like this: