Improving the System for Our Loved Ones: A Mother’s View of Addiction and Services

16 07 2014

Depressed teen free Morgue file

Guest author: name withheld for confidentiality

The day before Christmas, I received a phone call from my oldest son asking me to pick him up on a downtown corner in a risky neighborhood. He gets in the car wearing sunglasses even though the day is dark and cloudy.  My inner alarm sounds and my heart starts to tear… he is high again.  Back home I watch him slowly begin to detox. How many times does this need to happen?  My rule is that he can stay at home as long as he is willing to get help. Of course he agrees as he has nowhere to go. We plan to go to a local hospital inpatient unit but you have to be in a certain physical state to get admitted, and this depends on who is doing the intake and bed availability. Sometimes he can be admitted, sometimes not- yet he is the same person each time, out of control and in need of addiction treatment. We have to wait until Christmas morning to go there.  Not exactly my plan for a family Christmas but I am prepared to do whatever it takes to save his life. 

We arrive at the inpatient unit only to have him turned away. They say he is not sick enough. Really? He is an out of control addict using heroin, asking for help and I am terrified he will die. So now what?  He can’t come back home and refuses to go to a different hospital inpatient unit to see if he can be admitted there. So he decides to stay with a ‘friend’ as he cannot stay with me if he is not in treatment- it is too risky for my family because of past incidents. I drop him off, not knowing what he will do next and the heartache I feel is overwhelming.  What kind of mother turns her son out Christmas day? I feel like I am living in a perpetual grief state as I wait for the worst to happen.  Will this be the last time I see him?

It wasn’t always like this. His childhood was blessed- large and loving family, many friends, fun activities, and strong church involvement.  He graduated near the top of his high school class and attended a private university. But drugs don’t care if you have a college degree.

 Drug use. addictionImage courtesy of Victor Habbick-FreeDigitalPhotos.net ID-10073274I was told people can have the potential to be an addict long before they touch a drug.  This is true of my son.  He is very creative with an eccentric personality that is so fun yet always intensely, sometimes obsessively, focused on the current interest. When he latched onto a new interest that was not so healthy, the consequences became deadly.  After having suffered several major psychological traumas in his late teens, his addictive personality took over to stop his thoughts and feelings.  First it was alcohol, then marijuana, then pain killers finally escalating to heroin. The lies, the deceptions, the thefts from family and friends could no longer be ignored but I was determined not to lose my child. The service system is far from perfect and whether or not your child is receptive to help makes a difference.

older woman head in hands free morgue fileI have had people telling me to cut him off, let him hit rock bottom, and move on in with my life. And a few who said never give up on your child. How can I move on in my life when my son is a big part of it and needs help?  I also walked a fine line trying to avoid being the enabler. I struggled with every decision and often doubted if my choices were right.  Rock bottom can mean death. Will this push him to suicide or will he survive the next overdose? Will he start cutting his arms again? I have cried my eyes out over this, made myself physically and emotionally sick with worry and stress, mourned his death over and over, and planned his funeral.

Twice he was kicked out of inpatient residential programs for not following the rules leaving him with no place to go. How did that help him? He also quit seeing several outpatient therapists because he was smart enough to recognize their insufficient skills or they lacked the rapport needed to keep him in treatment. I have had him arrested, requested a three-day hold in psychiatric unit, cut him off financially, visited him in jail, begged for the best treatment placements through the drug court, taken him to therapy, attended NA meetings with him- often to no avail. I watched him make gains in his recovery only to relapse and have to start over. I remember when I first admitted to friends that he was an addict, I was told that expect him to relapse.  I was stunned by this statement- not my kid, he can do this. I was so wrong as the addiction was more powerful than my amazing, talented son.

 If I could offer any advice to families walking in my path and the service system, it would be:

 

  • For families, please persevere.  Ask many questions, seek help, get therapy, cry if you need to, get mad, and be prepared to fight the battle of your life. Give them hope when they are unable to do it for themselves.
  • Always believe in the person battling an addiction and never give up on them. Be compassionate and persistent even in the face of lies and relapses.
  • The addiction service system needs to find improved ways to meet the needs of people who are up sick and desperate for treatment.
  • Please stop turning them away from treatment saying they don’t meet criteria, or there is no room and giving them no place to go when they are sick and desperate.  
  • Find better places for residential treatment homes so they are not close to ‘crack’ houses that create great temptation.
  • When they keep their cell phones in residential treatment their dealers are still calling them- another temptation that could be avoided.
  • When they are in drug court, break the rules for participation and get throw out of treatment,  why are they immediately discharged from treatment on their own  and not turned immediately back over the custody of the courts?  They do eventually get re-arrested but the time in between can be deadly.  This is a big gap in the program that needs to be fixed.
  • Trauma and addiction go together as I saw this with my son. Psychological trauma is often part of why the person is addicted and both parts of who they are need to be treated as the drugs never go away as long as the emotional pain is still there. So intertwined, yet many of the counselors I interacted with did not have the skills or knowledge to provide effective treatment. I am told this is called a dual-disorder. Agencies need to support staff in gaining advanced treatment skills.
  • Remember that the family is suffering, too. My son’s addiction traumatized all of us. Family members need support. Whether you are a friend, family member or service provider, please understand and empathize with the feelings of shame, sadness, anger, guilt, embarrassment and helplessness we feel. The effect of addiction is devastating and the impact on families and friends is horrific, widespread and so long lasting as trust is often irreparably broken.

Epilogue: As of this moment, my son is in recovery and making progress with the support of a very skilled trauma and addiction therapist. I hope and pray each day that healing and recovery continue. Yet part of me still is still scared, still holding my breath each time the phone rings…

Resources:

New York State Combat Heroin & Prescription Drug Abuse http://combatheroin.ny.gov/

National Institute on Drug Abuse www.drugabuse.gov

Narcotics Anonymous www.na.org

Alcoholics Anonymous www.aa.org

Nar-Anon Family Groups www.nar-anon.org

National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence www.ncadd.org

SAMHSA evidence-based treatments for addiction http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/SearchResultsNew.aspx?s=b&q=addiction

SAMHSA Co-Occurring Disorders http://media.samhsa.gov/co-occurring/

National Center on Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care http://beta.samhsa.gov/nctic/trauma-interventions

Photo credits:

Woman and teen photos from www.morguefile.com

Drug photo credit- Drug and addiction use courtesy of Victor Habbick at www.freedigitalphotos.net





Trauma-Informed Medical Care? Not at my doctor’s office…

11 08 2013

meat words image courtesy of Victor Habbick at freedigitalphotos.net ZOMBIE MISTID-10076674

Yep, this topic is one of my passions: trauma-informed medical care, trauma-informed systems of medical-care, and the problem of its frequent absence in health-care settings. I have met some wonderful, compassionate medical professionals. Yet I routinely encounter those whose attitude and behavior causes patient anxiety, emotional distress, fear, and is sometimes psychologically retraumatizing. Even though patient contact may be limited to only a few minutes, it is still possible to create trauma-informed experiences that benefit the patient.

Here are some examples of what is not  trauma-informed medical care:

  • An RN case manager calls my husband after he is home from the hospital after a severe heart attack. Three times during the conversation she asks him why he had to go to the emergency room. Each time he replied that he was afraid he was going to die. (And the paramedics took him to the hospital.)  We filed a complaint and received prompt follow-up from the insurance company…but what happened in the medical provider’s system and in the nurse’s life and training  that caused such an insensitive encounter to occur?
  • At each of my frequent primary care visits, I am asked to fill out a long list of questions detailing all of my health problems. Anytime I have to discuss my medical history, I get very upset and my blood pressure rises significantly. I just prefer not to think about it, to focus on the progress, and not on the long list of medical diagnoses. Even though I explained that this process was upsetting to me, staff insisted I must comply as it was (the dreaded) policy. So I completed the awful form at home, scanned it into my computer so that each visit I just print it out, add the date and any new issue that requires attention and this does not upset me anymore. On one visit the nursing assistant who had been told before I did not want to use these forms, took me into the treatment room and then tossed a pile of these forms onto the chair where I was going to sit. She informed me that the copy I was bringing in did not have the doctor’s section on the back and I needed to use their double sided form. Big sigh…I tried not to sound belligerent as I said that my forms are scanned and printed- perhaps staff could just staple or tape their form onto the back of mine?  I handed the forms back to her and sat down. No response from her, but she never tried that again!
  • I had a recent appointment at a specialist’s office where I had been seen before but had to switch to a different doctor in the practice as mine left. The nurse said nothing but  “hello, have a seat”- no eye contact during the entire time. She then proceeded to rapidly ask me a long list of standard medical status questions. She displayed no compassion or concern for the fact that I stated my symptoms had worsened significantly in the last three months. I felt like a faceless piece of meat or at best, a shirt in a garment factory being checked by Inspector 32. This is not about the ten minutes it took to go through the medical questions that were important for the doctor to know. It is about how it was done and that it was not trauma-informed/trauma-sensitive as I was very anxious about the worsening symptoms, the impact on my quality of life, and what the future held for me.

Some people have developed Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) from serious health issues, near death experiences and many trauma survivors in the healthcare system frequently have additional medical, behavioral health or mental health needs. How can the healthcare system address the needs of people who have had traumatic experiences that are impacting their physical health as well as their emotional health? To start, every healthcare professional should make themselves familiar with the landmark Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study of 17,000 individuals that demonstrated the strong correlation between childhood trauma/abuse and adult health problems. Watch the fourteen-minute summary video of the ACE study.

So what is Trauma-Informed Care (TIC)?

Trauma-Informed Care involves a focus on “What happened to you?” instead of “What’s wrong with you?”  While the healthcare profession typically focuses on individual diagnoses, symptoms, and treatments, I see the bigger issue as what is happening to people with medical issues, how it affects their ability to function and how it affects their quality of life. I frequently bring up the issue of quality of life with my physicians. I have never heard a medical professional talk about quality of life without me first raising the issue and bringing this perspective into the diagnosis and treatment process. TIC also encompasses the policies, services, and practices for both patients and staff. It minimizes the chance of individuals being re-traumatized by healthcare services.

The Fallot (2006) five guiding principles of Trauma-Informed Care  apply to patients and the entire organization including the employees. I elaborated on the definitions to enhance their applicability to medical settings.

1. Safety- ensure the physical and emotional safety of patients and employees. Shift to a whole person focus of “what happened to you?” instead of “what is wrong with you?” Make the physical environment welcoming, comforting, clean and safe. Value the patient’s experiences and perspectives so they feel safe. Ask them  “how are you managing to cope with these symptoms/disability/pain?” Or perhaps “how is this affecting your work and home life?”

2. Trustworthiness- provide clear and sufficiently detailed information about what patients and employees can expect and need to know; maintain appropriate professional boundaries. Return calls and requests for information consistently and in a timely manner.

3. Choice- prioritize patient and employee experiences of choice and control. Give patients options including evidence-based options so that they can make an informed decision; respond respectfully to their questions as they clarify needed information to make an informed decision. Tell them why you recommend a particular treatment, listen to their questions, and let them make an informed choice.

4. Collaboration- maximize collaboration and the sharing of power with patients and employees; it is the patient’s body so the final decision is theirs; work together with them in partnership; remember that other medical providers may be involved and multiple differences of opinions often occur that the patient must process; the provider seeks collaboration with involved other providers. Create a treatment plan together with the patient, follow it, and update it as desired by the patient through collaborative discussion. Listen to office and support staff ideas and concerns as they often have great suggestions to improve the practice and service for the patient.

5. Empowerment- recognize patient and employee strengths and skills; acknowledge patient experiences and their inner wisdom regarding their health and employee ideas regarding service provision. Patients are empowered when they are given enough information to make informed decisions. Allowing the patient to be in the “driver’s seat” may feel uncomfortable to some, but it can be very empowering to many patients.

 

Is TIC different from good customer service? Yes,  they are different although they have many similar components. A medical setting that has great customer/patient service is more likely to be trauma-informed for staff and patients, and less likely to trigger or re-traumatize a patient. However, TIC includes much more than just good customer service. In addition, there is the larger policy issue of identifying those children, youth, and adults who are trauma survivors when they enter the healthcare so that their needs can be effectively addressed with appropriate referrals and coordination of services.

So what kinds of things can make a medical or other healthcare setting trauma-informed? (Various resources are listed at the end of the blog.)

  1. Train all staff on the basics of psychological trauma and Trauma-Informed Care as well as the relationship between trauma and addiction, and the impact of childhood trauma on adult illness, disability, and death. This is a brochure on Medical Traumatic Stress: What Health Care Providers Need To Know related to pediatric illness, injury and traumatic stress from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network I was not able to find anything similar for adult trauma-informed medical care.
  2. Examine the environment, processes, forms, policies, etc. that staff and patients are exposed to and obtain input from patients through a focus group or other means to make progress toward changes to make services more trauma-informed.
  3. Ensure that any assessment tools are used as required by medical guidelines for assessing needs of trauma survivors. Have referral information readily available.
  4. Advocate as healthcare providers and patients for coordination in healthcare systems, collaboration with behavioral health and mental health providers,
  5. Practice good customer service and implement the five principles of Trauma-Informed Care.

This topic could fill a whole book, but I hope I have offered enough to give you a good start! Check out some of the resources below.

Author: Lesa Fichte, LMSW, Director of Continuing Education

Resources

Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia http://www.chop.edu/professionals/pediatric-traumatic-stress/about-pediatric-traumatic-stress/trauma-informed-care-for-healthcare-providers.html

SAMHSA National Center on Trauma-Informed Care http://www.samhsa.gov/nctic/

Brochure on Medical Traumatic Stress: What Health Care Providers Need To Know related to pediatric illness, injury and traumatic stress from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network http://www.chop.edu/export/download/pdfs/articles/traumatic-stress-pdf-cpts-mtsbrochure.pdf

Medical Trauma from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network http://www.nctsn.org/trauma-types/medical-trauma

The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study http://acestudy.org/ and http://www.cdc.gov/ace/index.htm

Relationship of Childhood Abuse and Household Dysfunction to Many of the Leading Causes of Death in Adults: The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study http://www.ajpm-online.net/article/PIIS0749379798000178/abstract

Using Trauma Theory to Design Service Systems: New Directions for Mental Health Services,  Maxine Harris and Roger D. Fallot (2001) http://www.amazon.com/Trauma-Theory-Design-Service-Systems/dp/078791438X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376250212&sr=8-1&keywords=harris+and+fallot

Trauma-Informed Services: A Self-Assessment and Planning Protocol, Community Connections: Roger D. Fallot, Ph.D. and Maxine Harris, Ph.D. (March, 2006) http://smchealth.org/sites/default/files/docs/tisapprotocol.pdf

International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies http://www.istss.org/Home.htm

Traumatic Stress: An Overview, American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress http://www.aaets.org/arts/art1.htm

Article: Some Medical Trauma Might Induce Later PTSD http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/some-medical-trauma-might-induce-later-ptsd-0716132

How to Provide Good Customer Service in a Health Care Setting http://www.ehow.com/how_7372599_provide-service-health-care-setting.html

Customer Service in Health Care Optimizing Your Patient’s Experience by Karen A. Meek http://pacificmedicalcenters.org/images/uploads/KCMS_Customer_Service_in_Healthcare.pdf

University at Buffalo School of Social Work Institute on Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care http://www.socialwork.buffalo.edu/ittic/

Trauma-Informed Care Information & Resources, University at Buffalo School of Social Work http://www.socialwork.buffalo.edu/facstaff/tic_resources.asp

Video from the Cleveland Clinic on ‘Empathy: The Human Connection to Patient Care’. Provides great perspective on remembering that you don’t know what a person is experiencing or feeling inside; we all have struggles. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDDWvj_q-o8&feature=share

University at Buffalo School of Social Work Trauma-Informed and Human Rights MSW Curriculum http://www.socialwork.buffalo.edu/about/tihr.asp

Trauma-Informed Certificate Programs and workshops from the University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education http://www.socialwork.buffalo.edu/conted/trauma.asp

Photo credit: image courtesy of Victor Habbick at www.freedigitalphotos.net








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