Improving the System for Our Loved Ones: A Mother’s View of Addiction and Services

16 07 2014

Depressed teen free Morgue file

Guest author: name withheld for confidentiality

The day before Christmas, I received a phone call from my oldest son asking me to pick him up on a downtown corner in a risky neighborhood. He gets in the car wearing sunglasses even though the day is dark and cloudy.  My inner alarm sounds and my heart starts to tear… he is high again.  Back home I watch him slowly begin to detox. How many times does this need to happen?  My rule is that he can stay at home as long as he is willing to get help. Of course he agrees as he has nowhere to go. We plan to go to a local hospital inpatient unit but you have to be in a certain physical state to get admitted, and this depends on who is doing the intake and bed availability. Sometimes he can be admitted, sometimes not- yet he is the same person each time, out of control and in need of addiction treatment. We have to wait until Christmas morning to go there.  Not exactly my plan for a family Christmas but I am prepared to do whatever it takes to save his life. 

We arrive at the inpatient unit only to have him turned away. They say he is not sick enough. Really? He is an out of control addict using heroin, asking for help and I am terrified he will die. So now what?  He can’t come back home and refuses to go to a different hospital inpatient unit to see if he can be admitted there. So he decides to stay with a ‘friend’ as he cannot stay with me if he is not in treatment- it is too risky for my family because of past incidents. I drop him off, not knowing what he will do next and the heartache I feel is overwhelming.  What kind of mother turns her son out Christmas day? I feel like I am living in a perpetual grief state as I wait for the worst to happen.  Will this be the last time I see him?

It wasn’t always like this. His childhood was blessed- large and loving family, many friends, fun activities, and strong church involvement.  He graduated near the top of his high school class and attended a private university. But drugs don’t care if you have a college degree.

 Drug use. addictionImage courtesy of Victor Habbick-FreeDigitalPhotos.net ID-10073274I was told people can have the potential to be an addict long before they touch a drug.  This is true of my son.  He is very creative with an eccentric personality that is so fun yet always intensely, sometimes obsessively, focused on the current interest. When he latched onto a new interest that was not so healthy, the consequences became deadly.  After having suffered several major psychological traumas in his late teens, his addictive personality took over to stop his thoughts and feelings.  First it was alcohol, then marijuana, then pain killers finally escalating to heroin. The lies, the deceptions, the thefts from family and friends could no longer be ignored but I was determined not to lose my child. The service system is far from perfect and whether or not your child is receptive to help makes a difference.

older woman head in hands free morgue fileI have had people telling me to cut him off, let him hit rock bottom, and move on in with my life. And a few who said never give up on your child. How can I move on in my life when my son is a big part of it and needs help?  I also walked a fine line trying to avoid being the enabler. I struggled with every decision and often doubted if my choices were right.  Rock bottom can mean death. Will this push him to suicide or will he survive the next overdose? Will he start cutting his arms again? I have cried my eyes out over this, made myself physically and emotionally sick with worry and stress, mourned his death over and over, and planned his funeral.

Twice he was kicked out of inpatient residential programs for not following the rules leaving him with no place to go. How did that help him? He also quit seeing several outpatient therapists because he was smart enough to recognize their insufficient skills or they lacked the rapport needed to keep him in treatment. I have had him arrested, requested a three-day hold in psychiatric unit, cut him off financially, visited him in jail, begged for the best treatment placements through the drug court, taken him to therapy, attended NA meetings with him- often to no avail. I watched him make gains in his recovery only to relapse and have to start over. I remember when I first admitted to friends that he was an addict, I was told that expect him to relapse.  I was stunned by this statement- not my kid, he can do this. I was so wrong as the addiction was more powerful than my amazing, talented son.

 If I could offer any advice to families walking in my path and the service system, it would be:

 

  • For families, please persevere.  Ask many questions, seek help, get therapy, cry if you need to, get mad, and be prepared to fight the battle of your life. Give them hope when they are unable to do it for themselves.
  • Always believe in the person battling an addiction and never give up on them. Be compassionate and persistent even in the face of lies and relapses.
  • The addiction service system needs to find improved ways to meet the needs of people who are up sick and desperate for treatment.
  • Please stop turning them away from treatment saying they don’t meet criteria, or there is no room and giving them no place to go when they are sick and desperate.  
  • Find better places for residential treatment homes so they are not close to ‘crack’ houses that create great temptation.
  • When they keep their cell phones in residential treatment their dealers are still calling them- another temptation that could be avoided.
  • When they are in drug court, break the rules for participation and get throw out of treatment,  why are they immediately discharged from treatment on their own  and not turned immediately back over the custody of the courts?  They do eventually get re-arrested but the time in between can be deadly.  This is a big gap in the program that needs to be fixed.
  • Trauma and addiction go together as I saw this with my son. Psychological trauma is often part of why the person is addicted and both parts of who they are need to be treated as the drugs never go away as long as the emotional pain is still there. So intertwined, yet many of the counselors I interacted with did not have the skills or knowledge to provide effective treatment. I am told this is called a dual-disorder. Agencies need to support staff in gaining advanced treatment skills.
  • Remember that the family is suffering, too. My son’s addiction traumatized all of us. Family members need support. Whether you are a friend, family member or service provider, please understand and empathize with the feelings of shame, sadness, anger, guilt, embarrassment and helplessness we feel. The effect of addiction is devastating and the impact on families and friends is horrific, widespread and so long lasting as trust is often irreparably broken.

Epilogue: As of this moment, my son is in recovery and making progress with the support of a very skilled trauma and addiction therapist. I hope and pray each day that healing and recovery continue. Yet part of me still is still scared, still holding my breath each time the phone rings…

Resources:

New York State Combat Heroin & Prescription Drug Abuse http://combatheroin.ny.gov/

National Institute on Drug Abuse www.drugabuse.gov

Narcotics Anonymous www.na.org

Alcoholics Anonymous www.aa.org

Nar-Anon Family Groups www.nar-anon.org

National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence www.ncadd.org

SAMHSA evidence-based treatments for addiction http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/SearchResultsNew.aspx?s=b&q=addiction

SAMHSA Co-Occurring Disorders http://media.samhsa.gov/co-occurring/

National Center on Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care http://beta.samhsa.gov/nctic/trauma-interventions

Photo credits:

Woman and teen photos from www.morguefile.com

Drug photo credit- Drug and addiction use courtesy of Victor Habbick at www.freedigitalphotos.net





Dueling Disorders- the battle inside…

30 08 2013

Dueling

No, the title is not a typo. I know that Dual Disorders   and Co-occurring Disorders  are the correct terms for the combination of substance abuse and mental health disorders. I think a better term to bring home the power of this comorbid brain and body chaos is “Dueling Disorders.”  That’s what killed my brother. The mental health issues and addictions battled within him, each fueling the fight until he finally surrendered. The treatment he was given did not help him stop the battle.

I do not believe he had any hope that the behavioral health and medical system could help him. Maybe it was the lack of hope for healing that really killed him and not the Dueling Disorders? Our family will never know for certain.

In our work, I ponder if we too easily  compartmentalize people’s needs and address only their parts we are most comfortable with?  If yes, does this impair our ability to see the whole person in front of us- their strengths, their joys, their dreams, their level of confidence, their history of trauma, their façade or “curtain” that they put forth to hide behind, as well as the parts of themselves with addictions and mental health challenges? Humans hide in plain sight so what does it take to create a good therapeutic relationship so you can have a chance to  see the whole person and engage them in treatment?

Why was I inspired to write this post?

Obviously, my brother is always on my mind. But also because the title of an article in the August 2013 publication of Counselor: The Magazine for Addictions Professionals stopped my breath: Dual Diagnosis: Expectation, Not Exception.   The point being that we should expect that our clients come to us with a Dual Diagnosis and not just expect a single diagnosis.  And working at a school of social work with a trauma-informed curriculum and trauma continuing education programs, I am acutely aware of the need to see the whole person. I don’t know if any care provider ever saw the whole of my brother. I think they only saw his successful facade and the little bits he would reveal that he needed help with. 

According to SAMHSA, approximately 8.9 million adults have co-occurring disorders.  And approximately 90% of those seen in public behavioral health settings have a trauma history. I find these numbers horrifying, a sad statement about the world we live in.

Thoughts on how to begin to help people more effectively

  • Is your agency or practice current with evidence-based treatment for co-occurring disorders? Does it adhere to the principles from SAMHSA for an integrated screening and assessment process?
  • Does it offer a trauma-informed environment that follows the guiding principles of safety, trustworthiness, choice, collaboration, and empowerment? Are services person-centered? Is there universal trauma screening? How do staff effectively build  therapeutic relationships?
  • If your organization has clinicians who are highly skilled in working with those who have a co-occurring disorders, is there anything more that can be done to share their skills with less experienced clinicians?
  • If your clinicians lack sufficient skills and knowledge to best meet the needs of this population, what is one step you could take to begin to address this need?
  • Is lethality assessed and if there is risk, is it part of the treatment plan?
  • If you or your agency are in state of “overwhelm” from workloads, complex client needs, and rapidly changing regulatory expectations, what is one step you can take to best serve this population? If you woke up tomorrow, and clients were better served, what would be different?
  • if your services are not where you want them to be and you do not know what to do first, start by asking the “5 Whys” to get to the root issue.
  • Have you reviewed your strategic plan  for needed updating to better serve people’s needs?
  • Do you collect program evaluation data so you know what service  outcomes are?

Some days, we just need to stop and take a breath to celebrate how much we already do to effectively help people heal, and identify the steps to get us to enhanced skills in evidence-based and best practice so that even more people can have that chance. And remember that hope is one of the most powerful things we can give our clients in a therapeutic relationship. Resource information is listed below.

Hope and belief in the ability to heal is a lifeline.

Author: Lesa Fichte, LMSW, Director of Continuing Education

Selected References & Resources

 SAMHSA

TIP 42 Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons with Co-Occurring Disorders http://store.samhsa.gov/product/TIP-42-Substance-Abuse-Treatment-for-Persons-With-Co-Occurring-Disorders/SMA12-3992

Based on TIP 42 Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons with Co-Occurring Disorders http://www.samhsa.gov/co-occurring/topics/healthcare-integration/CODQGAdmin.PDF

Effectively serving individuals with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders requires integrated screening and assessment processes.http://www.samhsa.gov/co-occurring/topics/screening-and-assessment/index.aspx

Evidence-based Practice for Dual Disorders  http://www.samhsa.gov/co-occurring/topics/training/OP5-Practices-8-13-07.pdf

Jacobs, D. & Brewer, M. (2004).  American Psychiatric Association Practice Guideline: Provides recommendations for Assessing and Treating Patients with Suicidal Behaviors. Psychiatric Annals 34:5 (373-380). Also on line at www.stopasuicide.org/downloads/Sites/Docs/APASuicideGuidelinesReviewArticle.pdf

Trauma-Informed Care

National Center on Trauma-Informed Care  http://www.samhsa.gov/nctic/

Trauma-Informed Assessment and Screening PowerPoint http://view.officeapps.live.com/op/view.aspx?src=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.theannainstitute.org%2FDTSA.ppt

Trauma Assessment for Adults – Self-Report Version (one tool from the above PowerPoint) http://www.istss.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=TraumaAssessmentandDiagnosisSIG&Template=/CM/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=3227

Greater Buffalo Trauma-Informed System of Care Community Plan http://www.hfwcny.org/Tools/BroadCaster/Upload/Project327/Docs/HFCWNY_Trauma_Report_Interactive___Final.pdf

Online Trauma-Informed Clinical Foundation Certificate Program, University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education http://www.socialwork.buffalo.edu/conted/trauma-ticfc.asp

University at Buffalo School of Social Work Institute on Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care http://www.socialwork.buffalo.edu/research/ittic/

Treatment Outcome Evaluation

Scott D. Miller, PhD. Free Session Rating Scale and Outcome Rating Scale. http://scottdmiller.com/performance-metrics/

Therapeutic Relationship

Evidence-based Therapeutic Relationships http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/Norcross.aspx

Therapeutic Relationship vs. Treatment Model blog post by Ricky Greenwald, PsyD http://www.childtrauma.com/blog/therapeutic-relationship-vs-treatment-model/

Videos

Video from TedX: 11 minutes of a powerful story from a young man who tells a “stop in your tracks” story about what depression feels like. A must listen for every human service professional. http://www.upworthy.com/this-kid-thinks-we-could-save-so-many-lives-if-only-it-was-okay-to-say-4-words?c=ufb1

Video: 5 minutes from Claudia Black Ph.D. – Double Jeopardy: Addiction & Depression http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xean4EFGjC0

Photo Credit: Free Photos from www.morguefile.com

 








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